Participatory mapping and geographical patterns of the social landscape values of rural communities in Zanzibar, Tanzania

  • Nora Fagerholm
  • Niina Käyhkö

Abstract

People attach commonly approved social values subjectively to landscape. These values vary spatially and can be studied in geographical context. In sustainable management of cultural landscapes, social values should be taken into account as professionally as the analysis of physical landscape features. This case study applies participatory and GIS techniques in the mapping and geographical analysis of social landscape values in a multifunctional cultural landscape in Zanzibar island, Tanzania. Social landscape data were collected with single-informant interviews using participatory GIS (PGIS) techniques. Four different social landscape values (subsistence, traditional, aesthetic and leisure) were mapped on an orthophotoimage individually by 149 informants. Data were spatially and statistically analysed to construct understanding of the community level patterns of the social landscape values. Results show geographical differences between individually and collectively held values in their distribution and clustering across the landscape. These patterns reflect local culture and its interpretation of different social landscape values. Results address the importance of local stakeholder participation when spatial planning and management of multifunctional cultural landscapes are realized. The paper discusses these management implication and methodological challenges of using participatory GIS techniques in studying cultural landscapes.
Section
Research Papers
Published
Jan 1, 2009
How to Cite
Fagerholm, N., & Käyhkö, N. (2009). Participatory mapping and geographical patterns of the social landscape values of rural communities in Zanzibar, Tanzania. Fennia - International Journal of Geography, 187(1), 43-60. Retrieved from https://fennia.journal.fi/article/view/3703