Extreme and extremist geographies: commentary on the revanchist impulse and its consequences for everyday bordering

  • James Wesley Scott University of Eastern Finland

Abstract

As Fassin and Windels (2016) argue, political xenophobia needs to be explained politically. At the same time, while political xenophobia is not a necessary consequence of neoliberalism, the idea of what counts as ‘political’ needs to be expanded.  I suggest that one fruitful, non-reductionist strategy for understanding the consequences of identitary bordering consists in exploring links between securitization and the politicization of identity and national belonging. Inspired by the ideas of Henk van Houtum and Rodrigo Lacy, I approach the extreme geographies of identity politics from an ethical and philosophical perspective, arguing that a powerful revanchist and self-referential narrative of authenticity and autonomy is influencing both everyday bordering practices and the way security is discursively framed.


 

Section
Reflections
Published
Jun 17, 2017
How to Cite
SCOTT, James Wesley. Extreme and extremist geographies: commentary on the revanchist impulse and its consequences for everyday bordering. Fennia - International Journal of Geography, [S.l.], v. 195, n. 1, p. 102-105, june 2017. ISSN 1798-5617. Available at: <https://fennia.journal.fi/article/view/63677>. Date accessed: 21 nov. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.11143/fennia.63677.